The Less-Dead

The Less Dead

I’m one of those writers who require background noise while I write. In a perfect world, I’d do most of my writing in a bustling coffee shop in the middle of a vibrant neighborhood. A French Quarter balcony in New Orleans preferred, but I’m currently in my sleepy seaside village of Pass Christian, Mississippi, so I subsidize the lack of noise with music or television.

The other day I had The Thom Hartmann show on Free Speech TV. Full disclosure: In my opinion, Hartmann is one of the brighter social contemporary minds there are and I highly recommend his books.

While I only half listen while working, I was riveted when he said, “We still practice human sacrifice in America…”

I was like, “What? Come on, Thom! You’re really living up to your ‘shock jock’ reputation!” Then I sat back, listened, thought about it, and almost called him, but the idea is too complex. It’s too maniacal and nuanced for a short conversation. Here’s the clip. http://www.thomhartmann.com/bigpicture/we-still-practice-human-sacrifice-america-and-why-and-how.

Here are my thoughts: About 12 or 13 years ago, I took an undergrad victimology class. It was one of the most interesting classes I have ever taken. The title of the text book was The Killers Among Us: An Examination of Serial Murder and its Investigation, 2nd Edition by Steven A. Egger. Gotta love that! Now you know why I got a Behavioral Science degree to augment my writing!

In his book on page 88, Egger introduces us to the idea or the theory of The Less-Dead. In other words, people deemed less meaningful or valuable in life by society are, therefore less valuable or meaningful in death aka, the Less-Dead. To Egger’s way of thinking, the Less-Dead are targeted more by serial killers and other serial criminals because we, the people as a society deem them less valuable or even bad. They are mostly female, but not limited to that particular gender; prostitutes, LGBTQ, addicts, homeless, people of color, and generally poor people. Egger refers to these “marginalized groups of society who compromise the majority of the serial killer’s victims” as the Less-Dead because “before their death, they ‘never were’ according to society.” He goes on to explain that as a result, law enforcement feels “less pressure” to investigate properly. “They are not ‘like us’, so their deaths do not matter.” Which, to this writer’s way of thinking perpetuates their societal devaluation and continued disadvantaged victimology; a horrendous and vicious cycle. It also goes a long way to explain police brutality in certain neighborhoods. Incidentally, the 2nd edition of Egger’s book was published in 2002, so this explanation is nothing new. It’s just been devalued to great travesty.

Think about it. If a victim is white, affluent, and especially beautiful, the media will spend days reporting on the crime. Where is the media when that victim is poor or black or from an urban environ? Where are the media if the victim is a member of the LGBTQ community? How about if the victim is homeless or addicted? Are these people somehow less deserving of the attention? If so, why?

Ours is to ask why and have the courage to learn. In essence, to become more human.

In this context, Thom is very much on the mark. He’s on to something too when he mentions economic disparity as well as mass incarceration and the death penalty that are part and parcel to our Criminal Justice System. These contemporary issues illustrate how we sacrifice millions of our fellow Americans every day. They may not be quick bloody sacrifices as in our past, but slow ones are oftentimes more brutal.

This begs the question. Are we the killers among us?

I continue my work on The Zombie Company Series. I’ve just finished the final rough draft of Part 3 of Book 2, Illusion of Power. My collaborator, Thad David wrote some phenomenal action scenes. He creates a visceral distinct line between the living and the not-so-living that draws us in and makes us think about what it means to be alive, to fight every battle every day to not be the Less-Dead.

As the zombie hordes grow in Illusion of Power and the political collapse and ensuing intrigue mounts, I can’t help but think of the reality of today’s Less-Dead. After all, in the time of The Zombie Scourge, they will be the first to succumb.

In the post zombie apocalyptic world, who will become the new Less-Dead?

Be mindful, my friends. Life is precious and so very short for too many.

J.

Pass Christian, MS

 

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